Articles Tagged with: password security

ADWARE

Adware is unwanted software designed to throw advertisements up on your screen, most often within a web browser. Some security professionals view it as the forerunner of the modern-day PUP (potentially unwanted program). Typically, it uses an underhanded method to either disguise itself as legitimate, or piggyback on another program to trick you into installing it on your PC, tablet, or mobile device.Read More


spyware -PasswordStealer

Spyware.PasswordStealer is a generic detection for applications that may run in the background and silently collect information about the system, connected users, and network activity.  Spyware.PasswordStealer may attempt to steal stored credentials, usernames and passwords and other personal and confidential information.  This information may be transmitted to a destination specified by the author.  Spyware.PasswordStealer may allow an attacker to install additional software to the infected machine, or may direct the infected machine to participate in a malicious botnet for the purposes of sending spam or other malicious activities.Read More


Piggybacking

In two-way communication, wherever a frame is received, the receiver waits and does not send the control frame (acknowledgment or ACK) back to the sender immediately. The receiver waits until its network layer passes in the next data packet. The delayed acknowledgment is then attached to this outgoing data frame. This technique of temporarily delaying the acknowledgment so that it can be hooked with the next outgoing data frame is known as piggybacking.Read More


SIM SWAP FRUAD

SIM SWAP

SIM swap is a type of phishing fraud that poses a serious threat to the customer and bank security. The fraudster obtains an individual’s banking details through phishing techniques or by purchasing these from organised crime networks. They then use this information, including personal details sourced via social media, to pose as the victim to the mobile network operator and fool them into cancelling and reactivating the victim’s mobile number to a SIM in their possession. As a result, all calls and texts to the victim’s number are routed to the fraudster’s phone, including one-time passwords for banking transactions. After receiving a one-time pin or password from a bank, the fraudster can then potentially access the customer’s bank account and transfer fundsRead More